~THE SIX-GUN JUSTICE PODCAST~

CELEBRATING THE BLAZING SIX-GUN ACTION OF THE WESTERN GENRE

IN BOOKS, MOVIES, TV, AND ANY OTHER MEDIA AT HOME ON THE RANGE...

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

SIX-GUN JUSTICE CONVERSATIONS—SCOTT D. PARKER

SIX-GUN JUSTICE CONVERSATIONS
SCOTT D. PARKER
It's Wild West Wednesday and time for another Six-Gun Justice Conversation segment as co-host Paul Bishop chats with western wordslinger Scott D. Parker, author of the Calvin  Carter Railroad Detective series. His new book, The Sunset Express is co-written with Edward A. Grainger, in which both authors' popular western characters cross paths...

Available now on all major podcast streaming platforms or by clicking the link below...
 

Monday, September 20, 2021

SIX-GUN JUSTICE SPEED LISTEN—HELLBENDERS HISTORY PART 1

SIX-GUN JUSTICE SPEED LISTEN
HELLBENDERS HISTORY PART 1
Get ready to fan your trigger and enter the fray in this Six-Gun Justice Speed Listen installment. Get ready to ride hell for leather along with co-hosts Paul Bishop and Richard Prosch as they talk about the deadly gunplay, the great characters, the fast action, and the history behind Rich's new Western series, Hellbenders, and get ready to rope your next great read...Available now on all major podcast streaming platforms or by clicking the player below...
 

Friday, September 17, 2021

WESTERN NOVELS—HELLBENDERS #2

WESTERN NOVELS—HELLBENDERS #2
SEVEN DEVILS ROAD
Following in the bestselling tracks of the first book in the Hellbenders series comes Hellbenders #2: Seven Devils Road, written by Six-Gun Justice Podcast co-host Richard Prosch. Seven Devils Road is an all out, guns blazing blazing, horses galloping actioneer guaranteed to jangle your spurs and make you go for your tied down bullet spitter...The best new Western series of 2021...

HELLBENDERS#2
SEVEN DEVILS ROAD
Chuckholes and raging rivers, fog, rain, and impossibly steep grades—it’s the spring of 1860.

The Butterfield Overland Trail is more than hazardous for a lone coach hurling down the Missouri run between Syracuse and Fort Smith, Arkansas. But for Texas Ranger Lin Jarret and his pack of Hellbenders charged with freighting $10,000 in stolen loot, it’s a raging gauntlet of gunfire and death.

As the deadly Order of the Ivory Compass aims to engulf the Show-Me State, Texas Ranger Lin Jarret, Reece Sinclair, and Micah LeMay face an impossible assignment in their second explosive adventure in the exciting new Western series—Hellbenders...

TO BUY CLICK HERE

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

WESTERN MAGAZINES—SADDELBAG DISPATCHES

WESTERN MAGAZINES
SADDELBAG DISPATCHES
The award-winning home of great western fiction, Saddelbag Dispatches is also a top sponsor of our Six-Gun Justice Podcast. We appreciate their friendship and support along with running a beautiful ad for the podcast within their pages.

The latest issue of Saddelbag Dispatches—Summer 2021—Is available now...Along with the stunning layout and graphics, the issue is filled from first page to last with great reading—including a terrific Western tale from Six-Gun Justice Podcast co-host Richard Prosh as well as featuring a regular column from the podcast's other co-host, Paul Bishop...Here is a look at what else you'll find inside...

SADDELBAG DISPATCHES—SUMMER 2021
We've got cowboys, lawmen, Native Americans, and mountain men. We offer wild horses, pickup trucks, buckboards, wagons, and more. 

Leading our lineup this issue is our exclusive interview with legendary Western star Robert Fuller of such television classics as Laramie and Wagon Train. Author J.B. Hogan returns with Part Four of his long-running serial novel, The Last Rider, leading a star-studded roster of fictioneers including Spur Award-winning authors Richard Prosch and Phil Mills, Jr., Willa Award-winner Velda Brotherton, John T. Biggs, Jacob Bayne, Kathleen Morris, Neala Ames, and Sharon Frame Gay. 

We've got Cowboy Poetry from Will Rogers Medallion Award-winner Marleen Bussma, R.G. Yoho, and Phil Mills, Jr., and nonfiction articles and columns from Terry Alexander, Paul Bishop, Regina McLemore, Michael McLean, Barbara Clouse, and more. 

Last but certainly not least, we're proud to announce the winners of our Inaugural Saddlebag Dispatches Mustang Award for Flash Fiction, including stories from all three of our winners and the top five honorable mentions. This is the place where Western stories come to be told, folks. The only question is which adventure do you want to dive into first?
TO BUY CLICK HERE

SIX-GUN JUSTICE CONVERSATIONS—CASEY COWAN

SIX-GUN JUSTICE CONVERSATIONS
CASEY COWAN
It's time for another Wild West Wednesday Six-Gun Justice Conversation segment. Today podcast co-host Richard Prosch interviews Saddelbag Dispatches' graphic design editor Casey Cowan...

Cowan has worked in and around the journalism, artistic, and literary fields for twenty-five years as a reporter, photographer and graphic designer. In 2013, he helped co-found Oghma Creative Media, a publishing company built around the idea of authors and artists banding together as a team to take control of and market their work effectively. This, in turn, led to a partnership with the late Western wordslinging icon Dusty Richards. In 2014, they co-founded Saddlebag Dispatches, a twice-yearly magazine dedicated to the spirit and legacy of the Old West through fiction, poetry, culture, and history. 
 
Available now on all major podcast streaming platforms or by clicking on the player below...
 

Monday, September 13, 2021

SIX-GUN JUSTICE PODCAST EPISODE 42—WESTERN LIGHTNING PART TWO

SIX-GUN JUSTICE PODCAST EPISODE 42
WESTERN LIGHTNING PART TWO
Whoa, there! Don't let that team of yoked horses runaway with the stagecoach. Slow 'em down as it's time to listen to as the Six-Gun Justice Podcast presents part two of Western Lightning. In this episode, co-hosts Paul Bishop and Richard Prosch go dashing across the frontier protecting the stagecoach strongboxes of Wells Fargo while exploring the associated movies, books, TV shows  connected to the iconic stageline. 
 
Available now on all major podcast streaming platforms or by clicking on the player below...
 

Sunday, September 12, 2021

WESTERN MOVIE TIE-INS—STAGECOACH


WESTERN NOVELS—WELLS FARGO

 









WESTERN TIE-INS—TALES OF WELLS FARGO

 

 


 











WESTERN COMICS—WELLS FARGO BRITISH COMIC ANNUALS








WESTERN NOVELS—LAST TRAIN TO BRANNOCK

WESTERN NOVELS
LAST TRAIN TO BRANNOCK
Paul previously reviewed one of the four Clayburn novels, The Man in Black, for our Six-Gun Justice blog, and ever since, I’ve wanted to pick up one of the entries in the four book series by Marvin Albert—writing under his Al Conroy pseudonym. I got the chance with one of our recent round robin boxes produced by members of our Men’s Adventure Paperbacks group on Facebook. 
 
Last Train to Bannock
is from 1963, second in the series after Clayburn (1961). Followed by Three Rode North (1964) and The Man in Black (1965). The Clayburn novels, however, can be read in any order.
A wandering gambler, Clayburn—no first name—dresses impeccably for the casino, but otherwise wears a buckskin shirt, Levis, and a pearl-handled revolver. 
 
The story opens with Clayburn walking into a stage coach station near Parrish City. Inside, a pair of hired killers are waiting on the stage driven by Harry Farnell. The men aim to kill Farnell, who Clayburn later learns is in the freighting business with a tough gal named Cora Sorel. The shooters work for Cora Sorel’s rival, a wagon train teamster called George Adler. 
 
Everything hinges on a gold strike in the mountains near Bannock—which was a real Montana mining town, though the story seems to be set somewhat south of the region. Farnell and Cora Sorel plan to freight a ton of supplies into the mine camp where they’ll recoup three times their value. Adler has the same idea.
 
 
When Farnell is killed at the station, Clayburn naturally steps in and the fierce competition is on. It’s a wagon train race into the mountains with plenty of fighting and shooting. I got a kick out of Albert's writing, which was reminiscent of Ben Haas—aka: John Benteen of Fargo fame (but not Wells Fargo). It's good, tough prose, but it never takes itself too seriously. Just as Clayburn has no first name, Cora Sorel always goes by both names, a fun gimmick a lot of writers use—me included—which I first noticed in Robert B. Parker's Looking for Rachel Wallace. 
 
A few bits of trivia. The paperback copy I have is a Dell reprint from 1979 and features a cover painting of Clayburn climbing up onto a railroad locomotive under the Last Train to Bannock title. Anybody reading the book however might be confused as the story is about a wagon train, not a steam-powered railroad train. A glaring mistake.
 
 
Author Marvin Albert wrote a slew of books, most in the western and crime genres, under various pen names. He originally used the name Al Conroy for his Clayburn novels, though they were later reprinted by Fawcett in 1989 under his real name. One of the Clayburns was made into a movie—as you may know—The Man in Black became from 1967, with Dean Martin, George Peppard, and Jean Simmons. 
 
Albert was no stranger to the screen, having seen at least three of his previous westerns made into movies. In this instance he also wrote the screenplay based on his novel. However, Albert’s screenplay for what became Rough Night In Jericho, ended up being quite different from the book it was based on, The Man In Black. This led to the weird twist of the studio commissioning a movie tie-in novelization of Rough Night In Jericho, written by Richard Mead—another pseudonym for Ben Haas.
 
 
Albert’s other Westerns that made it to the screen include Apache Uprising, filmed as Dual at Diablo in 1966, The Bounty Killer, filmed as The Ugly Ones also in 1966, and Renegade Posse filmed as Bullet for a Badman in 1964.
 
 
His most famous work however, was his first western, The Law and Jake Wade, filmed in 1958, starring Robert Taylor. 
 
Last Train to Bannock is a solid action-adventure with a tough-guy loner whose as good with his fists and a gun as he is ferreting out a card-sharp and sweeping the book’s heroine off her feet.